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This is a great question that can be intimidating to many newly diagnosed people. There are three ways that people currently pay for supplies. About 65% of people have some form of insurance that covers them. The rest don’t and pay cash. If you pay cash, check out Diathrive’s plans by clicking on this link: https://diathrive.com/#plans. Diathrive provides hospital quality supplies at wholesale prices so it’s many times the most affordable way to get quality testing supplies. Plus you get a money back guarantee and you can have them shipped to you automatically so you never run out.

For those whose insurance “covers” their supplies, it’s worth looking into that a little further. First find out what your deductible is. A deductible is an amount that you have to pay before your insurance covers anything. These days some insurances actually have a separate deductible for what they call “durable medical equipment” or “DME”. That’s how they categorize diabetes testing supplies. If your deductible is high or you have a separate deductible that applies to your testing supplies, you should check out Diathrive’s prices at https://diathrive.com/#plans and see if you would be better off not using your insurance and simply buying directly from Diathrive.

Another factor to consider if you believe your insurance covers your diabetes testing supplies is to find out what their requirement are for paying claims. For example, some insurances might have a limit to the number of supplies you can order at any one time. Most require a prescription from a doctor, which means you’re going to have to pay whatever your responsibility is for a doctor visit, which is usually $50 or more. For people who don’t have to test very frequently, it can often be cheaper to pay cash for their diabetes testing supplies instead of going through all the hassle insurance companies require to pay for the supplies.

Another aspect to consider when buying diabetes testing supplies is what co-payments your insurance requires. The co-payment is usually expressed as a %. You should consider it in conjunction with your deductible. The co-payment is the percentage that you have to pay even when your insurance will pay. It can range from 0% to 90%, meaning that if you have a 0% co-payment then your insurance covers the full cost of the supplies and if your co-payment is 90% then you have to pay 90% of the cost.

The final thing to consider is how that cost is calculated. Insurances bill using standardized pricing called “allowables”. An “allowable” frequently has little relation to retail pricing. For example, the allowable for one bottle of 50 diabetes test strips can frequently range from $50 to $100, even though it can cost less than $8 at Diathrive.com. Almost all your payments using your insurance count towards your deductible. However it can be more expensive than you think depending on your insurance’s allowables. For example, if your allowable is $50 for a bottle of test strips, purchasing enough diabetes testing supplies to test your blood sugar once a day for three months might cost you $100 out of pocket until you meet your deductible whereas the same strips through Diathrive would only cost you $24 with steeper discounts if you purchase more.

Key considerations are what other illnesses you have, how much you expect to spend on your healthcare and when. Will you spend enough to meet your deductible and how quickly will you spend it? Many people with insurance don’t want to put up with the hassles of meeting all the requirements and hassle it takes to purchase diabetes testing supplies and instead purchase through Diathrive. Check out our plans at https://diathrive.com/#plans. Regardless of whether you’re a customer or not please feel free to pass this article on to others to help them figure out how to pay for their testing supplies.